GS-35B on VHF, UHF and SHF
Triode Grounded Grid Linear Amplifier Project
For Amateur Radio by W4ZT
(Latest update done on March 13, 2008)
WARNING! DANGER! HIGH VOLTAGE!
This project uses dangerous high voltages.
These voltages will not just shock you, they will kill you.
Use extreme caution while building, working on and testing.
Always THINK SAFETY! Only YOU can prevent accidents.

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GS-35B "The Ugly Russian"
Manufactured at the "Souz" (Union) factory in Novosibirsk,
Russian Siberia
GS-35B
Medium mu triode vacuum tube
Other than by band, these links are provided in no particular order. Thanks to everyone for your links!
(click on the links or the pictures for more information)
  • W4ZT Socket - This is my GS-35B tube socket or mounting fixture design. It virtually eliminates the stray inductance in the grid circuit. Click on the picture to see the details of the construction. The socket to the right has my *Teflon® Chimney in place.

    You can make this socket using ordinary hand tools without special skills or materials. There is no lathe work required for this design. If you are handy with hand tools you can construct this socket yourself.
    Or, I can build one for you!
GS-35B Amps on VHF, UHF and SHF:
Miscellaneous
-
 
50 MHz
  • G4ICD - 6 meter GS35B amp. 6/9/2006 - Geoff advises he is out of ham radio. Chris, G3WOS, took over Geoff's efforts and advises that the GS-35 amp was never completed. He does have Geoff's 8877 amp info on his site which can be used for information:
    http://www.gare.co.uk/g3wos.htm
 
144 MHz
-
 
144 MHz and 432 MHz
 
432 MHz
 
23 cm
 
GS-35B Amps on HF and other information
Click here
 

WARNING! DANGER! HIGH VOLTAGE!
Your safety is YOUR responsibility. The information provided here is for information purposes only. No liability is assumed by providing you with this information.

Please work safely. If you don't feel safe, step back and avoid the danger.
  • Don't work on this kind of project while you are tired.
  • Don't work alone.
  • Don't work with the power on!
Remember, capacitors store energy and they can deliver a dangerous shock long after the primary power source has been removed. Keep one hand in your pocket.
Better still, keep BOTH hands in your pockets :~)

This page was started February 11, 2004 and the last update was on March 13, 2008.